Search Results for: student loan forgiveness

Student Loan Forgiveness for Nonprofit Workers

If you are employed by a nonprofit, you may be eligible for student loan forgiveness.

We hear time and again that employee recruitment and retention is a barrier faced by many nonprofits, and that student loan forgiveness would help attract a young, talented workforce, and keep them from leaving the sector in search of better benefits.

What many nonprofits and their employees don’t know if that student loan forgiveness does exist. In fact, the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network helped to pass the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007 that led to the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program, which you can use to have your student loans forgiven starting in 2017.

The CCRA will cover the remaining balance (principal and interest) on your student loans after you’ve made 120 payments if you have eligible loans, make qualifying payments, and work for a qualifying public service organization.

There are steps you need to take now to make sure that you are eligible come 2017.

  • Only certain loans will qualify for the forgiveness program, but you can move your federal student loans so that they are eligible. Only Ford/Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Direct PLUS loans, and Direct Consolidation Loans are eligible (to learn more go here), but you can move your current federal student loans into the Direct Loan program. Move them there by consolidating them at loanconsolidation.ed.gov. (You can do this even if you’ve already consolidated them in the FFEL program.) Choose the income-based repayment plan to get the maximum amount of loan forgiveness.
  • Another important thing to know is that before you are eligible for loan forgiveness you must make 120 payments (10 years’ worth) towards your loan while employed full-time in a qualifying nonprofit job. Your employment does not need to be continuous, but only payments you’ve made since 2007 will count.
  • Make sure to keep documentation of your nonprofit employment each year, in case it is necessary. For example, keep a copy of your W-2 statements and the last pay stub of each year in a file folder. Also have your employer complete an employment certification form (instructions). You should consider submitting the form annually and whenever you change employers to make sure that your time counts towards the loan forgiveness.
  • See a full list of resources to learn more about student loan forgiveness on MNN’s website.

Pass this news on! Many nonprofit employees aren’t aware that they may qualify for student loan forgiveness.

Webinar Materials: Public Service Loan Forgiveness: What You Need To Know

Thank you for attending the July 26, 2017 webinar Public Service Loan Forgiveness: What You Need To Know by American Student Assistance. See below for a recording of a similar webinar, oriented specifically towards nonprofit workers.

Webinar Recording

Leadership and Employee Resources

Employee College Repayment AssistanceLeadership-Employee-Resourc

Congress.gov: College Cost Reduction and Access Act (PDF)

Equal Justice Works: Student Debt Relief

Federal Student Aid

Financial Aid Calculator

Income-Based Repayment Info

MNN: Student Loan Forgiveness for Nonprofit Workers

 

Leadership Succession

Annie E. Casey Foundation: Nonprofit Executive Leadership and Transitions Survey

Free Management Librart: How to Do Succession Planning

MNN: But what if you get hit by that bus?

National Council of Nonprofits (NCN): Facing the Future

NCN: Succession Planning for Nonprofits

Raffa: Transition Guides

TSNE MissionWorks: Leadership New England Report

 

Leader Resources

Free Management Library: Free Basic Guide to Leadership and Supervision

MNN 411 Article: Creating a Great Place to Work – It’s All About Leaders

MNN 411 Article: Nonprofit Leaders Should Not Try to do Everything

MNN 411 Article: Sink, Swim or Soar – The Choice is Yours

MNN 411 Article: Zoning Basics for Nonprofit ED’s

TSNE MissionWorks: Be a Better, Adaptive Supervisor

 

Mission Statement

Free Management Library: Basics of Developing Mission, Vision and Values Statements

Foundation Center: Develop Vision and Mission Statements

Grant Space: Nonprofit Mission Statements Online Resources

Raise Funds: Don’t Make Your Organization’s Statement of Purpose A “Mission Impossible”

 

For more information regarding Organizational Development and Managing Employees, check out our Development Resources page.

Looking for professional advice and support? Check out our business directory. If you have a resource or tool you think might be a good fit for this or any of our resource pages, you can submit it here.

These Resource Pages contain external links. The Massachusetts Nonprofit Network is not responsible for the privacy policies or content of these links. MNN does not endorse the products or services provided by these links.

Candidate Questionnaire

candidate-slider-after-primary

With the 2014 gubernatorial election approaching, the Massachusetts Nonprofit Network distributed a questionnaire for the candidates that captures important opportunities and challenges impacting the state’s nonprofit sector. Central to the creation of the questionnaire are the five public policy themes that emerged from MNN’s statewide focus groups and are the core of our long-term legislative agenda. You can learn more about these five themes in Charting the Course, Establishing a Public Policy Agenda for an Effective, Efficient, and Essential Nonprofit Sector in Massachusetts.

All gubernatorial candidates were invited to participate in the survey (view the questions here). Candidate’s responses will be made available as soon as we receive them.

Get Involved!

Nonprofits are essential to Massachusetts residents and vital to the state’s economy, and we encourage you to help inform the election by sharing the candidates’ views on important nonprofit issues that impact all Massachusetts residents. Share the candidates’ responses or start an online conversation on Twitter or Facebook. Candidate twitter handles are included in their responses below.

      Charlie Baker (R)

@CharlieForGov

1. Nonprofits are the cornerstones of our communities and the lifeblood of the Commonwealth. They enrich the culture and beauty of our state, provide essential services for those at risk, and impact the quality of life of every single resident. Describe your personal experience with nonprofits.

I have spent a significant portion of my professional career working in the nonprofit sector. My first jobs out of college were with the New England Council and the Massachusetts High Technology Council. After graduating from business school and spending a couple of years in management consulting, I co-founded Pioneer Institute for Public Policy Research. From there I went into state government for almost eight years, after which I returned to the non-profit sector, first as CEO of Harvard-Vanguard Medical Associates and then as CEO of Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. Equally important, I have been an active volunteer, supporter and board member for numerous nonprofits over the years. Perhaps most notably in terms of my own personal engagement with the sector, I volunteered as a Big Brother when I was a freshman in college and ended up serving for almost 10 years on the board. I currently serve on the board of the Phoenix Network, which operates three college prep high schools in Chelsea, Lawrence and Springfield (starting in August 2014) for older, disconnected, and underserved students.

Through my work and my life, I am deeply aware and appreciative of the vital and varied contributions Massachusetts’ vibrant nonprofit sector makes in our Commonwealth. My campaign slogan is “Let’s be great, Massachusetts.” This aspiration can only be fulfilled if our state’s nonprofit sector remains strong.

 

2. The nonprofit sector is a significant economic and social engine in Massachusetts, with more than 35,000 nonprofit organizations employing almost 17% of the state’s workforce. What would you do as Governor to support efforts to recruit, retain, and train a strong and stable nonprofit workforce?

Massachusetts’ success, now and in the future, depends on our ability to develop, attract and keep the most talented people in the country. Thanks to our world-class colleges and universities, including our teaching hospitals, Massachusetts is a magnet for smart, entrepreneurial young people – literally from all over the globe. Our leading edge technology firms are perhaps the most obvious beneficiaries, but this inflow of human capital fuels our success across every facet of the economy, including the nonprofit sector. As much as a thriving nonprofit sector complements a successful commercial sector, the reverse is also true. Without a strong and growing economy, Massachusetts’ nonprofits will lose both talent and resources.

The greatest risk we face in the future is taking our unique competitive advantages for granted. We must continue to improve the quality of education at all levels, from pre-K through college and beyond, so that we are not just number one in the United States, but number one in the world. Equally important, we must make Massachusetts a place where people can afford to raise a family and build a business. Unfortunately, that’s just not the case today. From energy costs to business taxes, from housing prices to regulations, Massachusetts ranks as one of the most expensive, least business friendly states in the union. There is simply no reason why we can’t do much better and in a Baker administration we will.

 

3. New approaches and tools for tackling historically persistent challenges are emerging, or are already in practice, across the country. As Governor, how would you invest in promising nonprofit ideas, resources, and proven solutions that can strengthen the sector and solidify its position as a social innovation leader?

As a general principle, I do not believe state government should use taxpayer resources to pick winners and losers, whether in business or the nonprofit sector. Instead of providing subsidies or direct investments in private enterprises, the state should stay focused on creating the conditions for success that enable promising ventures to start, grow and thrive. That means a top-notch education and workforce development system, well-maintained and efficient infrastructure, streamlined regulation and permitting, and competitive costs of living and doing business. At the same time, there are some unique challenges that nonprofit organizations face in gaining access to the investment resources they need to fund innovation and growth. For example, MassDevelopment provides capital financing support for charter school operators and arts organizations. I am open to exploring similar approaches to facilitating investment in other segments of the nonprofit sector, including the use of social impact bonds as a vehicle for leveraging private investment capital to enable outcome-based public-private partnerships.

 

4. Civic engagement is the backbone of the nonprofit sector, with more than 1.3 million Massachusetts residents volunteering each year. What would you do as Governor to encourage citizen philanthropy and volunteerism?

One of the most powerful tools a Governor has is the bully pulpit, to rally public opinion and spur action on behalf of the common good. My own personal experience as a volunteer and charitable fundraiser provides me with a credible platform to encourage all of our citizens to get more involved in their communities and to shine a light on those nonprofit organizations that contribute so much to the well-being of the Commonwealth – especially on behalf of those among us who are suffering or in need. As Governor, I would continue the state’s support of public-private volunteer initiatives like the Massachusetts Service Alliance, the Commonwealth Corps, and the Mass Mentoring Partnership.

 

5. Nonprofits exist to serve the public interest and advance the common good and have been granted tax exempt status to further these efforts. As Governor, how would you protect this exemption for nonprofits and preserve the public trust that makes it possible?

I am committed to not raising taxes. That commitment certainly holds true for the nonprofit sector. I will veto any bill that reaches my desk that undermines the state’s nonprofit tax exemption. Equally important, as a former town selectman, I am firmly committed to protecting local aid from further cuts, which have decimated municipal budgets and put pressure on towns and cities to seek additional revenue from nonprofit organizations through payments in lieu of taxes. As Governor, I will further ensure that towns and cities receive their fair share of any increase in state revenue.

 

6. Nonprofits provide critical social safety net and quality of life services, often in close partnership with government. As Governor, how would your administration strengthen nonprofit and government collaboration?

Across a wide range of public services there are numerous opportunities for public-private partnerships, especially involving the nonprofit sector. Massachusetts is a hot-bed of social entrepreneurship, including nationally recognized nonprofit ventures like City Year, Citizen Schools, Jumpstart and Year Up. Massachusetts is also home to some of the highest performing charter school operators in the county, many of which are now taking their successful school models to scale by creating networks of independently managed public schools. State government must concentrate more of its resources on scaling up what works by leveraging the talent and capacity of entrepreneurial nonprofits, rather than continuing to fund a service delivery system that too often mitigates, rather than solves our most challenging problems.

 

7. The leadership structure put in place in the beginning of a Governor’s tenure is an indication of their priorities. Given the importance of nonprofits in Massachusetts, and their many and strong partnerships with the Commonwealth, where within your administration would you place a high level position responsible for ensuring the nonprofit sector as a whole has a voice at the table?

As someone who has spent a major portion of his adult life working and volunteering in the nonprofit sector, I will personally ensure that the interests of nonprofits are well represented within the executive branch of a Baker administration. Effective governing requires a streamlined structure, which encourages cross-agency communication, coordination and collaboration. Moreover, government works best when senior policy makers are able to place the people’s interest above the agendas of their own constituencies. As a result, I do not favor creating narrowly focused positions that can too easily lead to organizational siloes and unproductive inter-agency conflict.

 

      Martha Coakley (D)

@marthacoakley

Martha_Coakley_69061. Nonprofits are the cornerstones of our communities and the lifeblood of the Commonwealth. They enrich the culture and beauty of our state, provide essential services for those at risk, and impact the quality of life of every single resident. Describe your personal experience with nonprofits.

I understand the critical role that non‐profit organizations play in our Commonwealth, often filling the gaps created by government and the private sector to provide critical services, preservation, and enrichment. I am proud to have been a member of, and worked closely with, a number of different organizations that continue to tackle important challenges here in Massachusetts.

As the former President of the Women’s Bar Association, I worked to enhance the role of women in the legal profession; as member of the Board of Directors of the Dana Farber Cancer Institute, I sought to improve care for individuals and families living with cancer; and, as Chair of the Board of Middlesex Partnerships for Youth, I worked closely with leaders throughout Middlesex County to improve prevention and intervention strategies for young people.

In addition to these first hand experiences, it is my role as Attorney General to oversee all of the non-profits and public charities in Massachusetts. Through both my first‐hand experience and my administrative role, I have gained an appreciation for the enormous variety of non-profits in Massachusetts, the critical roles they play, and the complexity of challenges they often face. As Governor, I am committed to being a partner with non-profits and working diligently to increase their impact here in the Commonwealth.

 

2. The nonprofit sector is a significant economic and social engine in Massachusetts, with more than 35,000 nonprofit organizations employing almost 17% of the state’s workforce. What would you do as Governor to support efforts to recruit, retain, and train a strong and stable nonprofit workforce?

I believe the priorities for maintaining a strong and stable nonprofit workforce are increasing access to grants and other sources of funding for nonprofit organizations, and bringing down the cost of living for workers.

Massachusetts’ workforce has always been one of our greatest strengths; our public education system and private colleges and universities routinely turn out some of the brightest, most innovative young minds in the world. I believe, also, that many of these young people not only want to do well financially, but have a fervent desire to “do good.” The challenge is reducing the financial burden on these young people so that they are empowered to pursue a career in the nonprofit sector, which often pays less than the private sector.

One important piece of this effort is to ease access to grants and other sources of funding, especially for smaller nonprofits, so that they are able to offer their workers greater compensation. I believe we should explore opportunities to develop a one-stop resource, or introduce a statewide ombudsman, to give nonprofits a single point of entry into the various funding opportunities available and decrease complexity for organizations that, often, are already operating with limited resources.

In addition, it is important to decrease the financial burden on young workers and their families. I have proposed a system of full-need financial aid at Massachusetts’ community colleges, so that prospective workers can get critical post-secondary education without accruing crushing debt. I also believe we need to make adequate investments in public transportation and promote dense housing development, in order to create more options for individuals and families and drive down the cost of market-rate housing across the state.

Together, I believe these strategies will help us to grow and maintain a robust nonprofit workforce here in Massachusetts.

 

3. New approaches and tools for tackling historically persistent challenges are emerging, or are already in practice, across the country. As Governor, how would you invest in promising nonprofit ideas, resources, and proven solutions that can strengthen the sector and solidify its position as a social innovation leader?

As I discussed earlier, I think one critical component of this effort is streamlining access to grants and other sources of funding, to make it easier for nonprofits to proactively expand their own resources.

I believe another key piece is increasing collaboration between the nonprofit sector and our education system, particularly our institutions of higher learning, both public and private. Some of our most innovative thinking is currently taking place at colleges and universities and, at the same time, it is vitally important that college students get experience working in the “real world.” We need to fully capitalize on the potential for our nonprofit sector to leverage the human and intellectual capital that exists in our colleges and universities to enhance its impact.

As Governor, I would look for opportunities to build on models like the Northeastern University co-op program, to give nonprofits the affordable infusion of talent and energy that will help them create innovative solutions and/or expand existing programs to scale.

 

4. Civic engagement is the backbone of the nonprofit sector, with more than 1.3 million Massachusetts residents volunteering each year. What would you do as Governor to encourage citizen philanthropy and volunteerism?

From my career in public service, I recognize the tremendous mutual benefits of philanthropy and volunteerism. Not only does this type of engagement support the mission of our thousands of nonprofits; it can also be enormously beneficial to the individuals who choose to volunteer.

One key effort is to get young people involved in service early on, because this will set the stage for a lifetime of engagement. As Governor, I will work with our federal partners to renew funding for service-learning grants, in order to support the expansion of these programs in our public schools. I will also remain committed to supporting programs like YouthBuild, which combines academic instruction with service, helping to both empower young people and expand affordable housing in our communities.

I also believe it is important for us to make the connection between voluntarism and employment, especially for those who are unemployed or underemployed. Volunteering can support the development of valuable skills, including teamwork, communication, and leadership, which can help expand an individual’s employment opportunities. Incorporating volunteerism into our workforce development framework has the potential to engage individuals who otherwise would have been unlikely to volunteer, thereby expanding support for nonprofits that rely heavily on volunteers.

 

5. Nonprofits exist to serve the public interest and advance the common good and have been granted tax exempt status to further these efforts. As Governor, how would you protect this exemption for nonprofits and preserve the public trust that makes it possible?

As Attorney General, my role has been to oversee nonprofits and public charities in order to protect the public interest. I believe it is critical to hold those organizations that violate the public’s trust accountable, because robust oversight helps ensure public confidence in the vast majority of nonprofits, which are genuinely committed to advancing the common good.

I also believe we need to acknowledge the tremendous contributions nonprofits make to our communities, whether or not they are monetary. Some nonprofits, like hospitals and institutions of higher learning, do give back monetarily – either through community benefits programs (which the AG’s Office plays a critical role in) or PILOT payments. For other, often smaller, nonprofits the contributions can range from providing food and shelter to preserving a community landmark to providing music and art education.

As Governor, I will work closely with the next Attorney General to continue to hold bad actors accountable, and I will use the platform of the Governor’s office to continually promote the critical role that nonprofits play in every community across Massachusetts.

 

6. Nonprofits provide critical social safety net and quality of life services, often in close partnership with government. As Governor, how would your administration strengthen nonprofit and government collaboration?

My tenure as Attorney General has shown me the importance of building a team that has various areas of expertise, and which represents diverse interests, but is able to work collaboratively to reach shared objectives. As Governor, it would be my goal, in any policy discussion, to create dialogue between state government, non‐profits, private sector businesses, and community leaders, with the goal of creating the most mutually beneficial solutions.

In addition, nonprofits have numerous points of interaction with state government, and I am committed to having the nonprofit community at the table as we determine who should assume leadership positions in the various agencies and departments that must work closely with the nonprofit community.

Furthermore, I understand that state government and nonprofits can exponentially increase our impact if we work together; my office will have an open door policy for members of the community, and I will be committed to finding state level solutions to the shared challenges faced by nonprofits across Massachusetts, as well as recognizing the fact that a one-size‐fits‐all solution may not be appropriate for the wide range of nonprofits in the Commonwealth.

 

7. The leadership structure put in place in the beginning of a Governor’s tenure is an indication of their priorities. Given the importance of nonprofits in Massachusetts, and their many and strong partnerships with the Commonwealth, where within your administration would you place a high level position responsible for ensuring the nonprofit sector as a whole has a voice at the table?

I have a deep appreciation for the role that nonprofits play and will be committed to ensuring that they have a seat at the table. Additionally, I think the most important effort is expanding the notion that state government and nonprofits can support the effort of one another by working collaboratively, not just in the form a single person, but throughout state government.

Massachusetts is home to so many different nonprofits of different sizes, working on different issues, and facing different challenges that, while umbrella solutions may be appropriate for certain challenges, I believe many important policy decisions will be made at the individual organization level. To make state government responsive to these smaller‐scale challenges, it is important that leaders and employees in every agency understand what can be gained from effective collaboration.

 

      Evan Falchuk (I)

@efalchuk

1. Nonprofits are the cornerstones of our communities and the lifeblood of the Commonwealth. They enrich the culture and beauty of our state, provide essential services for those at risk, and impact the quality of life of every single resident. Describe your personal experience with nonprofits.

I’ve had the opportunity to work with an organization called Interise in Lawrence, Massachusetts. Interise works to stimulate economic revitalization in lower-income communities by educating small business owners on a lot of the valuable work and life skills people need to pair with their own elbow grease to make their businesses grow. They call it their “Streetwide MBA.” The work being done at Interise is like so much of what I’ve seen at many other nonprofits in Massachusetts I’ve had the privilege to visit over the course of my campaign in that it is innovative, smart and – maybe most importantly – greatly needed.

Understanding, valuing and supporting nonprofit organizations of all kinds is critically important in the 21st century, perhaps more so as each year passes. I’ve seen this whenever I meet with nonprofit organizations, whether it be Homes for Families, United Teen Equality Center, MASSCreative or the Citizen’s Housing and Planning Association. And it’s why when I meet with nonprofit staff and groups on the campaign trail it’s without a camera crew or trail of reporters. That isn’t and shouldn’t be the point. At least for me, it’s about learning and understanding the remarkable and needed connections between the work of nonprofits and state policy.

Finally, nonprofits serve the public good and are often the first ones to address needs in the community. In this sense, nonprofits should be seen as a kind of “first responders” to social challenges. Where they are successful they should be seen as models of programs that inform public policy, and drive innovation in our approaches to addressing these issues.

 

2. The nonprofit sector is a significant economic and social engine in Massachusetts, with more than 35,000 nonprofit organizations employing almost 17% of the state’s workforce. What would you do as Governor to support efforts to recruit, retain, and train a strong and stable nonprofit workforce?

Much of my work on this front would mirror the work I did during my 13 years on the executive team at Best Doctors Inc., a Boston-based global health company dedicated to providing patients worldwide with the right diagnosis and treatment. Here, it was critical to find staff who understood the value of the organizations’ core mission, and who weren’t just willing, but were passionate about carrying out the day-to-day tasks and objectives needed to meet critical goals.

Similarly, as Governor I would apply this same mindset, focusing on not only attracting and continually training the most skilled, dedicated workforce, but providing everything from ongoing research related to focus areas and roles, to measurable plans and surveys, not just on results, but on nonprofit workers’ feedback and impressions of their work and their valuable organizations. Without such an approach we dramatically undervalue not only these vital organizations, but the immeasurable potential each has to deliver real results, outcomes and change every single day.

 

3. New approaches and tools for tackling historically persistent challenges are emerging, or are already in practice, across the country. As Governor, how would you invest in promising nonprofit ideas, resources, and proven solutions that can strengthen the sector and solidify its position as a social innovation leader?

Such investment must be a top priority for the benefit, not only of so many nonprofits throughout the Commonwealth, but for the countless people whom they serve. Massachusetts, as we know, has earned its “leadership label” when it comes to social innovation. However, when we decide to place greater emphasis and dollars on truly promising nonprofit ideas and solutions we raise that “leadership label” to an entirely new – and better – level. It sounds good to generically say, “Yes, we should talk about increasing funding for that project.” But where is the actual plan when it comes to targeted, strategic investment in these important areas, to be made on an ongoing basis?

What will be required is more than just good-sounding platitudes. What is required is a governor who truly wants to learn and understand the nonprofit resources already in existence, but which, too often do not get the funding that should be made available by the state. This is particularly striking at a time when the government is willing to spend billions of dollars on projects like expanding the Boston Convention Center, tax breaks to large companies, government office renovations and other less impactful priorities. I pledge that in my first 100 days as governor, I would deliver a top-to-bottom review of all current funding for nonprofit organizations, and then take that data into clear account when working on our upcoming budget and legislative priorities. Nonprofits should never be considered a “luxury” or “add-on.” They must be a visible, valuable piece of our entire funding strategy and priority.

Another obvious first step must be to establish a permanent Interagency Coordinating Group, which failed to move this legislative session. In all honesty, I was surprised to discover that this had not been delivered by lawmakers sooner.

 

4. Civic engagement is the backbone of the nonprofit sector, with more than 1.3 million Massachusetts residents volunteering each year. What would you do as Governor to encourage citizen philanthropy and volunteerism?

One of the first practical steps we can and should take to encourage volunteerism and philanthropy is a prominent public education and awareness campaign. This campaign could do everything from shedding light on the impressive number of residents who already volunteer, to making a persuasive case that non-volunteers, by choosing to do so with nonprofits, have much to gain. I believe one of the fundamental pieces missing, when it comes to growing and supporting our nonprofits and countless related places for volunteers, is an organized cohesive communication vehicle to quickly learn about the many different types of volunteer positions which exist, and for current volunteers and organizations to share their experiences, insights, and volunteer “job leads.”

In addition, I propose that in tandem with the Interagency Coordinating Group, we launch the inaugural Massachusetts Volunteer Superstars awards. The point of the awards is more than just a keepsake trophy or newspaper article. The point of these high-profile awards is to spotlight the amazingly wide diversity of volunteers and opportunities available through so many nonprofit organizations. In the process, we will be able to shine a spotlight on the very heartfelt, human stories that lure people to team with nonprofits in the first place. This awards program should include, where applicable, a slate of scholarships to contributing state universities which recognize award-winning volunteers’ valued efforts, and more importantly helps to keep them in the world of Massachusetts nonprofits during their future work years.

 

5. Nonprofits exist to serve the public interest and advance the common good and have been granted tax exempt status to further these efforts. As Governor, how would you protect this exemption for nonprofits and preserve the public trust that makes it possible?

On this front the governor must collaborate with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle. That said, however, I pledge to do all in my power to protect this current tax exempt status, recognizing the importance of nonprofits being able to keep their organization running without interrupt or uncertainty, and understanding the financial struggles that accompany so many dedicated nonprofit organizations, their staff and volunteers. When it comes to preserving the public trust, a segment of our nonprofit public awareness campaign should be devoted to highlighting the incredible value that nonprofits and the work they provide our communities actually means for so many people throughout Massachusetts. People of all ages, all backgrounds, all income levels. I want people to understand, should the tax exemption issue be raised, how by preserving this status for nonprofits we actually are helping ourselves. The stronger and better equipped our communities and neighborhoods are the better for all of us every day.

 

6. Nonprofits provide critical social safety net and quality of life services, often in close partnership with government. As Governor, how would your administration strengthen nonprofit and government collaboration?

Here, I see tremendous opportunity to strengthen and expand nonprofit-government collaboration. Working in tandem with the Interagency Coordinating Group we would take an almost surgical approach to researching and assembling collaboration data on what has worked the best, what ideas or opportunities have such promise but are overlooked, and what projects – while well intended –perhaps should not have been a focus above others. Similar to ideas like the nonprofits public education campaign (mentioned earlier), it is data analysis and clear communication of results and best practices which I and many people believe are sorely lacking today. While I’m aware that much research already has been done on this front, we strengthen our hand when we build an arguable case about what has worked in the past, why there is such value in true nonprofit-government collaboration, and why such collaboration is worthy of needed time, resources, strategic advance planning, and of course related funding. Without effectively making the case to the sometimes skeptical public or legislation body, how can we expect to not just protect current resources, but develop and deliver bold new nonprofit-government efforts?

 

7. The leadership structure put in place in the beginning of a Governor’s tenure is an indication of their priorities. Given the importance of nonprofits in Massachusetts, and their many and strong partnerships with the Commonwealth, where within your administration would you place a high level position responsible for ensuring the nonprofit sector as a whole has a voice at the table?

When you consider the number of nonprofits in Massachusetts coupled with the number of communities which rely so deeply on their services and skills it defies logic that too often nonprofit funding and expansion strategy seems to be considered an “add-on.” Add to this our (still iffy) economy and gaping need for a cohesive, strategic plan where governments work with the nonprofit sector over the next decade and you realize what would help make a great difference is a Cabinet-level individual responsible for leading – in league with the Interagency Coordinating Group – efforts to redraw the nonprofit map in Massachusetts. By this I mean looking at the current nonprofit landscape and related funding as a whole, measuring priority needs, and laying out a ten-year plan for what additional amounts are needed and for planned, measurable outcomes.

 

 

      Scott Lively (I)


scott_lively1. Nonprofits are the cornerstones of our communities and the lifeblood of the Commonwealth. They enrich the culture and beauty of our state, provide essential services for those at risk, and impact the quality of life of every single resident. Describe your personal experience with nonprofits.

Nonprofit organizations are indeed the cornerstone of our communities. They have been a major part of my life, both personally and professionally. As the Managing Partner of Lively, Ackerman and Cowles Law Firm in Southern California, a substantial part of my practice was organizing and advising nonprofit entities. I presently manage two nonprofits here in Massachusetts which I founded: a church and a religious advocacy group.

 

2. The nonprofit sector is a significant economic and social engine in Massachusetts, with more than 35,000 nonprofit organizations employing almost 17% of the state’s workforce. What would you do as Governor to support efforts to recruit, retain, and train a strong and stable nonprofit workforce?

Massachusetts appears to have a good and mutually beneficial relationship with its nonprofit sector. If elected governor I would solicit advice on how to improve upon this relationship.

 

3. New approaches and tools for tackling historically persistent challenges are emerging, or are already in practice, across the country. As Governor, how would you invest in promising nonprofit ideas, resources, and proven solutions that can strengthen the sector and solidify its position as a social innovation leader?

I believe in creative solutions and the power of innovation by people who can “think outside the box.”  I will be looking for the answers to our many challenges from the innovators in our society, many of whom work in the nonprofit sector.  If an idea is truly good it will sell itself, and I will work to make government a facilitator of every truly good idea.

 

4. Civic engagement is the backbone of the nonprofit sector, with more than 1.3 million Massachusetts residents volunteering each year. What would you do as Governor to encourage citizen philanthropy and volunteerism?

As Governor I would  create new tax incentives for charitable giving and promote volunteerism through public service advertising.  I would also solicit ideas for helping high school and college students earn academic credit for volunteer activities.

 

5. Nonprofits exist to serve the public interest and advance the common good and have been granted tax exempt status to further these efforts. As Governor, how would you protect this exemption for nonprofits and preserve the public trust that makes it possible?

Unfortunately, there is a rising tide of hostility in certain parts of the American public toward the policy of providing tax exempt status for nonprofit entities. I believe government has an affirmative duty to educate the public on the tremendous value and benefit that nonprofits provide to our society.  I would vigorously oppose any encroachment on tax exemptions for nonprofits.  I would also work to add protections in the zoning laws to prevent misguided local governments from discriminating against tax-exempt entities in real property matters.

 

6. Nonprofits provide critical social safety net and quality of life services, often in close partnership with government. As Governor, how would your administration strengthen nonprofit and government collaboration?

Frankly, I think government is often more of a hindrance than a help in the work of nonprofits.  I think the role of government is to provide funding with appropriate oversight for projects and services which nonprofits can offer the public in lieu of government agencies.  I will be working to streamline Massachusetts government, and will be looking to the nonprofit sector for more efficient delivery of services that are presently managed by government entities.

For example, I will be working to create a private nonprofit risk-pools as an alternative to both socialized government healthcare and the for-profit insurance industry in order to return consumers to stakeholders in the cost-management of health care, and to reduce waste, fraud and bureaucratic red-tape.

 

7. The leadership structure put in place in the beginning of a Governor’s tenure is an indication of their priorities. Given the importance of nonprofits in Massachusetts, and their many and strong partnerships with the Commonwealth, where within your administration would you place a high level position responsible for ensuring the nonprofit sector as a whole has a voice at the table?

I myself will be the voice at table for nonprofits.  My door will always be open to representatives of the nonprofit sector who will know me as a friend and advocate.

 

      Jeff McCormick (I)

@JMacForGov

jeff_mccormick1. Nonprofits are the cornerstones of our communities and the lifeblood of the Commonwealth. They enrich the culture and beauty of our state, provide essential services for those at risk, and impact the quality of life of every single resident. Describe your personal experience with nonprofits. 

I believe strongly that non-profits play a critical role in ensuring that communities have a strong safety net. However, with funding always an issue, it is important that non-profits, the private sector and individual citizens work together to meet the funding needs. This is why my wife Christine and I have given to and volunteered for a variety of non-profits in Massachusetts and beyond. For example, I’ve served as the co-chair of Bostonians for Youth  and was a founding board member and lead sponsor of the Sean McDonough Charity for Children; both serving the needs of at-risk youth. I also am currently a Vice-Chair of the CitiCenter for Performing Arts and a four-time Dana-Farber marathoner.

 

2. The nonprofit sector is a significant economic and social engine in Massachusetts, with more than 35,000 nonprofit organizations employing almost 17% of the state’s workforce. What would you do as Governor to support efforts to recruit, retain, and train a strong and stable nonprofit workforce? 

Given the importance of the non-profit community in our commonwealth, you can’t start too early exposing children to options and careers available in the non-profit sector.  One barrier to our best and brightest joining non-profits is the low pay scale. I am focused on reducing the cost of health care for everyone in the commonwealth so that citizens have more resources to cover day-to-day life allowing them to choose a career in the field of their choice. I would also advocate for a student loan forgiveness or at least deferment at the federal level for those graduates who enter into the non-profit sector. Furthermore, I would work with one of our greatest resources, local colleges and universities, to encourage them to create stipend programs for graduates who join the non-profit sector, similar to the fellowship program that has succeeded at William and Mary Law School; which has resulted in higher employment numbers and greater participation in and introduction to the non-profit world.1
1 http://www.npr.org/templates/transcript/transcript.php?storyId=294887683

 

3. New approaches and tools for tackling historically persistent challenges are emerging, or are already in practice, across the country. As Governor, how would you invest in promising nonprofit ideas, resources, and proven solutions that can strengthen the sector and solidify its position as a social innovation leader? 

As I have travelled across the state it has become clear that one of the biggest barriers in the delivery of quality services is a lack of communication, coordination and transparency across departments. As Governor, a key priority of my administration will be to hold all departments accountable to ensure higher quality outcomes. Holding departments accountable will be aided by utilizing tracking data on trends of measurable results. Through this process we can also discover best practices that should be promoted and shared. As Governor, I will look to the non-profit sector for solutions to some of our most difficult issues as well as explore and expand pay for success models such as ROCA Inc. from Chelsea/Springfield.

 

4. Civic engagement is the backbone of the nonprofit sector, with more than 1.3 million Massachusetts residents volunteering each year. What would you do as Governor to encourage citizen philanthropy and volunteerism? 

As Governor, I will use the bully pulpit to be a strong advocate and supporter of non-profits and volunteerism. I will encourage volunteerism for all state employees. In addition, many of our school systems currently require a minimum number of community service hours to be completed by each student as a graduation requirement. I would encourage this practice to be expanded statewide for all of our high schools.

 

5. Nonprofits exist to serve the public interest and advance the common good and have been granted tax exempt status to further these efforts. As Governor, how would you protect this exemption for nonprofits and preserve the public trust that makes it possible? 

As Governor, I will allocate a certain portion of the budget to promote volunteerism and personally lead by example. I will oppose efforts that are designed to impact the tax-exempt status of non-profits.

 

6. Nonprofits provide critical social safety net and quality of life services, often in close partnership with government. As Governor, how would your administration strengthen nonprofit and government collaboration? 

I believe strongly that organizations cannot succeed if they do not have predictable and stable funding. I will work on long-term planning for state priorities that ensures our non-profit contracts are adequately funded, paid on time and have a predictable funding stream that extends beyond one year. I will also work to streamline reporting and procedures for grants and contracts so that non-profits can focus on the important work of delivering services instead of being burdened by unnecessary bureaucracy. In addition, in our first hundred days in office we will initiate an audit of all technology to ensure compatibility across systems to reduce duplication and redundancy.

 

7. The leadership structure put in place in the beginning of a Governor’s tenure is an indication of their priorities. Given the importance of nonprofits in Massachusetts, and their many and strong partnerships with the Commonwealth, where within your administration would you place a high level position responsible for ensuring the nonprofit sector as a whole has a voice at the table? 

I plan to have a member of the non-profit community as a member of my transition team to help ensure strong collaboration between the non-profit sector and state government. I also plan to appoint a liaison between my office and the non-profit community to ensure continued quality outcomes and the advancement of the industry as a whole.

 

411-Staff Resources

The following information is for nonprofit employees.

College Cost Reduction Act

The CCRA helps professionals in the nonprofit sector by offering a loan forgiveness program for those who apply and qualify. Read an overview of student loan forgiveness here.

If you meet three criteria, the CCRA will cover the remaining balance (principal and interest) on your student loans after you’ve made 120 payments.  The three key parts of the program require that you have eligible loans, make qualifying payments and work for a qualifying public service organization.

Equal Justice Works has some great webinars, worksheets and presentations which offer both a broad overview and some specific information about the CCRA:

http://www.equaljusticeworks.org/resources/student-debt-relief/student-debt-relief-webinar-series

Here are some more helpful resources:

Math Teacher – DYS Southeast Region

The Collaborative for Educational Services (CES) is seeking a passionate classroom Math Teacher to provide direct educational instruction to youth assigned to the Department of Youth Services (DYS) in Brockton, MA.  Our ideal candidate will value professionalism, positive youth development, and culturally responsive teaching, and be committed to working with youth who have been placed at risk. Classes are small and teachers should have a highly personalized approach with a focus on academic and behavioral success. We are a supportive team who offers teachers growth through coaching and continued professional development.  Candidates should possess a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, and a current Massachusetts teaching license in Mathematics at the secondary level (8-12); (5-8) will be considered. Other content areas at the secondary level (8-12) may also be considered. Demonstrated successful teaching with high-risk youth highly desirable. Successful candidates may be eligible for the teacher loan forgiveness program for up to $17,500. 

We may also consider unlicensed applicants – if you feel this is the right job for you, please apply!  CES has a Licensure Program to help you get your teaching career off to a great start.  Our convenient locations and hybrid-online format can help you easily make the transition to licensed teaching. 
 

We value: Quality and excellence, innovation, creativity and vision, inclusiveness, equity and diversity and collaboration with others. Creating a community of care is foundational to the work we do… together!

Social Justice and Equity work is central to our mission, especially in these times. We understand that all forms of oppression are damaging. We engage in this work pro-actively and purposefully, with the intent of positive outcomes, and because we need to.  
 
We hope that you will join us in this work!
 
This is you:

  • You have a passion for teaching all students, especially those who have been marginalized.
  • You value professionalism and culturally responsive educational opportunities.
  • You strive to understand emerging trends in education, seek to thoughtfully employ best practices, support diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI).
  • You recognize that addressing societal oppression and inequities requires ongoing education and a commitment to allyship. 

Highlights of What You Will Do:  

  • Help equip an especially vulnerable population of young people with the tools they need to see their world, and themselves, in a new light; allowing them to realize their own potential and new possibilities.
  • Teach small classes which are personalized to student needs with a focus on academic as well as behavioral success.
  • Work alongside other educators dedicated to improving life outcomes for highly vulnerable youth.

English Teacher – DYS Northeast Region (Middleton)

The Collaborative for Educational Services has an immediate opening for a dedicated English Teacher with a background in Digital Literacy/Computer Science (HS MA licensed English and/or Digital Literacy/Computer Science) to educate youth assigned to the Department of Youth Services in Middleton, MA. This is your opportunity to empower a population of young people who’ve had many challenges in their short lives. Our Teachers help students learn and grow, impacting them in ways that shape how they view the world and where they see themselves in it.

We Offer:

  • Compensation based on a union scale which includes paid sick and personal time
  • Participation in the Massachusetts Teachers’ Retirement System
  • Teacher loan forgiveness, up to $17,500 for qualified candidate
  • CES offers a variety of benefits, to learn more visit: CES Employee Benefit Guide

We value: Quality and excellence, innovation, creativity and vision, inclusiveness, equity and diversity and collaboration with others. Creating a community of care is foundational to the work we do… together!

Social Justice and Equity work is central to our mission, especially in these times. We understand that all forms of oppression are damaging. We engage in this work pro-actively and purposefully, with the intent of positive outcomes, and because we need to.

If you are looking for a rewarding career and an opportunity to help students learn and grow, this is the job for you. We hope you will join us in this work!

This is you:

  • A passionate and mission driven educator, committed to working with youth who have been placed at risk.
  • An innovative high school teacher, committed to positive youth development who values professionalism.
  • A teacher intent on providing high quality, personalized, college and career ready education.
  • A person who understands that addressing societal oppression and inequities requires lifelong learning and a commitment to allyship.

Highlights of What You Will Do:

  • Help equip an especially vulnerable population of young people with the tools they need to see their world, and themselves, in a new light; allowing them to realize their own potential and new possibilities.
  • Teach small classes which are personalized to student needs with a focus on academic as well as behavioral success.
  • Work alongside other educators dedicated to improving life outcomes for highly vulnerable youth.

Special Education Teacher – Special Education in Institutional Settings (SEIS) – DMH Worcester

The Collaborative for Educational Services is seeking a licensed Special Education Teacher to join our Special Education in Institutional Settings (SEIS) team and work in an adolescent Department of Mental Health program site in Worcester, MA. Our ideal candidate will hold a current Massachusetts license in Moderate Disabilities, level 5-12. This is a union contract position; salary is based on union scale which includes paid sick and personal time. Teachers in SEIS schools are part of the Massachusetts Teachers’ Retirement System. Teacher loan forgiveness may be available for successful candidates for up to $17,500!

CES offers a variety of benefits, learn more here: CES Employee Benefit Guide

Who We Are: Dedicated and collaborative teams of educators committed to supporting teaching excellence through coaching, professional development and excellent administrative support. CES prides itself on empowering its educators, and investing in professional development to help them grow as professionals.

We Value: Quality and excellence, innovation, creativity and vision, inclusiveness, equity and diversity and collaboration with others. Creating a community of care is foundational to the work we do, together.

Social Justice and Equity work is central to our mission, especially in these times. We understand that all forms of oppression are damaging. We engage in this work pro-actively and purposefully, with the intent of positive outcomes, and because we need to.

We hope that you will join us in this work!

This is you:
– have a passion for teaching all students, especially those who have been marginalized.
– You value professionalism and culturally responsive teaching.
– You love to learn, strive to understand emerging trends in education and seek to thoughtfully employ best practices.
– You support diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI).
– You recognize that addressing societal oppression and inequities requires ongoing education and a commitment to allyship.

 

Highlights of What You Will Do:
– Provide effective, high quality, direct educational instruction to youth assigned to the MA Department of Mental Health.
– Participate and implement effective instructional strategies and research based curriculum.
– Develop and implement curriculum lessons and mini-units, assessing and modifying as designated in student IEPs.
– Provide content area instruction, integrating students’ IEP goals and objectives, learning style information, accommodations and modifications as appropriate.

Review of resumes is ongoing and will continue until position is filled.

Special Education Teachers – DYS Regions (Dept of Youth Services)

The Collaborative for Educational Services (CES) has current openings for licensed Special Education Teachers to work in Department of Youth Services program sites in the Central, Metro, Northeastern, and Western region of Massachusetts as a member of our Special Education in Institutional Settings (SEIS) team. This is a union contract position; salary is based on union scale which includes paid sick and personal time. Teachers in SEIS schools are part of the Massachusetts Teachers’ Retirement System. Teacher loan forgiveness may be available for successful candidates – up to $17,500!

CES offers a variety of benefits, learn more here: CES Employee Benefit Guide
 
Who We Are:  Dedicated and collaborative teams of educators committed to teaching excellence through the provision of coaching, robust professional development and excellent administrative support.  CES prides itself on providing engaging learning opportunities to all its teachers.  
 
We Value:  Quality and excellence, innovation, creativity and vision, inclusiveness, equity and diversity and collaboration with others.  Creating a community of care is foundational to the work we do, together! 

Social Justice and Equity work is central to our mission, especially in these times.  We understand that all forms of oppression are damaging.  We engage in this work pro-actively and purposefully, with the intent of positive outcomes, and because we need to.  We hope that you will join us in this work!

This is you: 

·       You hold a current Massachusetts license in Moderate Disabilities, level 5-12 and a Bachelor’s degree from accredited college or university.

·       You love to learn!  You strive to understand emerging trends in education, seek to thoughtfully employ best practices, support diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI).

·       You recognize that addressing societal oppression and inequities require ongoing education and a commitment to allyship.

·       You have a passion for teaching all students, especially those who have been marginalized and would welcome an opportunity to teach small classes.

·       You value professionalism and culturally responsive teaching.

 

We are especially excited about candidates with experience working in institutional settings.  

 

Highlights of What You Will Do:  

·       Provide effective, high quality, direct educational instruction to youth assigned to MA Department of Youth Services.

·       Participate and implement effective instructional strategies and research based curriculum.

·       Develop and implement curriculum lessons and mini-units, assessing and modifying as designated in student IEPs.

·       Provide content area instruction, integrating students’ IEP goals and objectives, learning style information, accommodations and modifications as appropriate.

 

CES offer waivers and supports educators with the certification process.  If you are looking for a rewarding career and an opportunity to help students learn and grow, this is the job for you.   Review of resumes will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled. 

Review of resumes is ongoing and will continue until positions are filled. 
 

Middle School Science Teacher – Special Education in Institutional Settings (SEIS)

The Collaborative for Educational Services (CES) is seeking a MA Licensed middle school level Science Teacher to work at an adolescent Department of Mental Health program in Tewksbury, MA for the remainder of the 2020-2021 school year.  Experience working in institutional settings a plus.  Appropriate teacher license in special education is also desirable.

We may also consider unlicensed applicants – if you feel this is the right job for you, please apply!  CES has a Licensure Program to help you get your teaching career off to a great start.  Our convenient locations and hybrid-online format can help you easily make the transition to licensed teaching. 

This is a union contract position; salary is based on union scale which includes paid personal and sick time.  If you need it, sick leave may be advanced; 4.5 days for new hires; prorated based on start date. Teachers are part of the teachers’ state retirement system (MTRS) or the State Retirement System. Qualified staff may receive loan forgiveness – up to $17,500!
CES offers a variety of benefits, to learn more visit: Human Resources/CES Employee Benefits

Who We Are: Dedicated and collaborative teams of educators committed to supporting teaching excellence thru coaching, professional development and excellent administrative support.  CES prides itself on providing robust and engaging learning opportunities to all its teachers.

We value: Quality and excellence, innovation, creativity and vision, inclusiveness, equity and diversity and collaboration with others. Creating a community of care is a foundational to the work we do, together!

Social Justice and Equity work is central to our mission, especially in these times. We understand that all forms of oppression are damaging. We engage in this work pro-actively and purposefully, with the intent of positive outcomes, and because we need to. 

We hope that you will join us in this work!
 
This is you:

– You are an innovative, creative and collaborative secondary level Math Teacher; or an educator willing to secure an 8-12 level license at renewal, or within 2 years of renewal which occurs in the 19-20 academic year.
– You have a passion for teaching, especially youth who have been placed at risk.
– You welcome the opportunity to teach small classes which are personalized that focus on academic and behavioral success.
– You value professionalism, positive youth development, and culturally responsive teaching.
– You love to learn! You strive to understand emerging trends in education, seek to thoughtfully employ best practices, support diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI). 
– You recognize that addressing societal oppression and inequities requires ongoing education and a commitment to allyship. 
  

Highlights of What You Will Do:  

– Provide effective, high quality, direct educational instruction to youth assigned to DMH.
– Participate and implement effective instructional strategies and research based curriculum.
– Develop and implement curriculum lessons and mini-units, assessing and modifying as designated in student IEPs.
– Provide content area instruction, integrating students’ IEP goals and objectives, learning style information, accommodations and modifications as appropriate.